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WHAT IS A STUDENT?

A STUDENT is the most important person in any educational institution.

A STUDENT is not dependent on us.  We are dependent on him/her.

A STUDENT is not an interruption of our work. He/she is the purpose of it.

A STUDENT does us a favor when he/she enrolls.  We are not doing him/her a favor by serving him/her.

A STUDENT is a part of our work--not an outsider.

A STUDENT is not just a statistic.  He/she is a flesh and blood human being with feelings and emotions like us.

A STUDENT is a person who comes to us with his/her needs or wants. It is our job to fill them.

A STUDENT is deserving of the most courteous and attentive treatment we can give him/her.

A STUDENT is the life blood of this and every other educational institution.

Prospective Student Inquiry
Schedule an Appointment for Admissions with an Admissions Represenative

How to Contact the Admissions Office of New Educare Institute of Healthcare

Office Telephone: 973-642-4160

Address: 24 Commerce Street, Ste 401, Newark, NJ 07102

E-mail Address: admin@neihusa.com


False Information: Applicants are expected to demonstrate honesty in the completion of all necessary forms. False information will be grounds for rejection or dismissal.




Differentiating Cancers in Tabe of Neoplasm for Medical Coders
Carcinoma in situ
A group of abnormal cells that remain in the place where they first formed. They have not spread. These abnormal cells may become cancer and spread into nearby normal tissue. Also called stage 0 disease.

Benign
Benign tumors may grow larger but do not spread to other parts of the body. Also called nonmalignant.

Primacy Cancer
A term used to describe the original, or first, tumor in the body.

Secondary Cancer
A term that is used to describe cancer that has spread (metastasized) from the place where it first started to another part of the body.
Metastatic cancer is cancer that has spread from the place where it first started to another place in the body. A cancer that has spread from the place where it first started to another place in the body is called metastatic cancer. The process by which cancer cells spread to other parts of the body is called metastasis. Metastatic cancer has the same name and the same type of cancer cells as the original, or primary, cancer. For example, breast cancer that spreads to and forms a metastatic tumor in the lung is metastatic breast cancer, not lung cancer.
Source cancer.gov

ICD 10 Introduction ICD 10 CM VS ICD 10 PCS
ICD-10-CM
ICD-10, Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM) was developed by the U.S. National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) along with an advisory panel to ensure accuracy and utility in 1993.
The National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), the Federal agency responsible for use of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th revision (ICD-10) in the United States, has developed a clinical modification of the classification for morbidity purposes.
The ICD–10 code sets provide a standard coding convention that is flexible, providing unique codes for all substantially different health conditions. It also allows new procedures and diagnoses to be easily incorporated as new codes for both existing and future clinical protocols. ICD–10–CM and ICD–10–PCS provide specific diagnosis and treatment information that can improve quality measurements and patient safety, and the evaluation of medical processes and outcomes. ICD–10–PCS has the capability to readily expand and capture new procedures and technologies.
ICD–10–CM Diagnosis Codes CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) developed the ICD–10–CM code set, following a voluntary consensus-based process and working closely with specialty societies to ensure clinical utility and subject matter expert input into the process of creating the clinical modifications, with comments from a number of prominent specialty groups and organizations that addressed specific concerns or perceived unmet clinical needs encountered with ICD–9–CM. NCHS also had discussions with other users of the ICD–10 code set, specifically nursing, rehabilitation, primary care providers, the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA), long-term care and home health care providers, and managed care organizations to solicit their comments about the ICD–10 code set. There are approximately 68,000 ICD–10–CM codes. ICD–10–CM diagnosis codes are three to seven alphanumeric characters. The ICD–10–CM code set provides much more information and detail within the codes than ICD–9–CM, facilitating timely electronic processing of claims by reducing requests for additional information. ICD–10–CM also includes significant improvements over ICD–9–CM in coding primary care encounters, external causes of injury, mental disorders, neoplasms, and preventive health. The ICD–10–CM code set reflects advances in medicine and medical technology, as well as accommodates the capture of more detail on socioeconomics, ambulatory care conditions, problems related to lifestyle, and the results of screening tests. It also provides for more space to accommodate future expansions, laterality for specifying which organ or part of the body is involved as well as expanded distinctions for ambulatory and managed care encounters

ICD-10-PCS
CMS developed a procedure coding system, ICD–10–PCS. ICD–10–PCS has no direct relationship to the basic ICD–10 diagnostic classification, which does not include procedures, and has a totally different structure from ICD–10–CM. ICD–10–PCS is sufficiently detailed to describe complex medical procedures. This becomes increasingly important when assessing and tracking the quality of medical processes and outcomes, and compiling statistics that are valuable tools for research. ICD–10–PCS has unique, precise codes to differentiate body parts, surgical approaches, and devices used. It can be used to identify resource consumption differences and outcomes for CMS developed a procedure coding system, ICD–10–PCS. ICD–10–PCS has no direct relationship to the basic ICD–10 diagnostic classification, which does not include procedures, and has a totally different structure from ICD–10–CM. ICD–10–PCS is sufficiently detailed to describe complex medical procedures. This becomes increasingly important when assessing and tracking the quality of medical processes and outcomes, and compiling statistics that are valuable tools for research. ICD–10–PCS has unique, precise codes to differentiate body parts, surgical approaches, and devices used. It can be used to identify resource consumption differences and outcomes for different procedures, and describes precisely what is done to the patient. ICD–10–PCS codes have seven alphanumeric characters and group together services into approximately 30 procedures identified by a leading alpha character. There are 16 sections of tables that determine code selection, with each character having a specific meaning. (See section V of the August 22, 2008proposed rule (73 FR 49802–49803) for a chart that compares ICD–9–CM, ICD–10–CM, and ICD–10–PCS codes.)As explained in the August 22, 2008proposed rule (73 FR 49801), to our knowledge, no SSO has developed, adopted, or modified a standard code set that is suitable for reporting medical diagnoses and hospital inpatient procedures for purposes of administrative transactions. different procedures, and describes precisely what is done to the patient. ICD–10–PCS codes have seven alphanumeric characters and group together services into approximately 30 procedures identified by a leading alpha character. There are 16 sections of tables that determine code selection, with each character having a specific meaning. (See section V of the August 22, 2008proposed rule (73 FR 49802–49803) fora chart that compares ICD–9–CM, ICD–10–CM, and ICD–10–PCS codes.)As explained in the August 22, 2008proposed rule (73 FR 49801), to our knowledge, no SSO has developed, adopted, or modified a standard code set that is suitable for reporting medical diagnoses and hospital inpatient procedures for purposes of administrative transactions.

Advantage of ICD-10-CM/PCS:
1) Incorporates much greater specificity and clinical information, which results in:
a) Improved ability to measure health care services;
b) Increased sensitivity when refining grouping and reimbursement methodologies;
c) Enhanced ability to conduct public health surveillance; and
d) Decreased need to include supporting documentation with claims;
2) Includes updated medical terminology and classification of diseases;
3) Provides codes to allow comparison of mortality and morbidity data; and
4) Provides better data for:
a) Measuring care furnished to patients;
b) Designing payment systems;
c) Processing claims;
d) Making clinical decisions;
e) Tracking public health;
f) Identifying fraud and abuse; and
g) Conducting research.
Source: cdc.gov

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